Medicare Out-Of-Pocket Expenses Q&A

 

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How much does the average Medicare recipient pay out of pocket for medical expenses?

Q: How much does the average Medicare recipient pay out of pocket for medical coverage and expenses?

A: According to a Kaiser Family Foundation study published in 2018, the average Medicare beneficiary paid $5,503 in 2013, including premiums and out-of-pocket costs for covered care, as well as out-of-pocket costs for things like dental care and long-term care, which are not covered by Medicare. This amounted to 41 percent of the average per capita Social Security income — and that’s expected to increase to 50 percent by 2030.

The Kaiser Family Foundation study included both Original Medicare and Medicare Advantage enrollees. 28 percent of all Medicare beneficiaries were enrolled in Medicare Advantage plans as of 2013. It’s likely that total enrollee spending on Medicare has increased since 2013, as premiums, deductibles, and coinsurance have increased. But for seniors who end up in the Medicare Part D donut hole, total out-of-pocket spending may have decreased, as the Affordable Care Act has been gradually closing the Part D donut hole. But average prices for prescription drugs — and thus, the total amount that people pay in coinsurance, which is a percentage of the cost — have increased since 2013, so people who don’t end up in the donut hole may be paying more for their Part D prescriptions than they were several years ago.

In 2018, the standard Part B premium is $134/month, although most enrollees are paying about $130/month. In 2013, Part B premiums were $104.90/month. The Part B deductible is $183 in 2018. That’s the same as it was in 2017, but it was only $147 in 2013. The Part A deductible and coinsurance also increased slightly in 2018, as did the premium for Part A that applies to people who don’t have enough work history (or a spouse with enough work history) to qualify for premium-free Medicare Part A.

—medicareresources.org