by Marlene Satter

Lack of confidence, lack of knowledge and lack of money all plague workers trying to save for retirement, leaving them working longer than they planned and saving considerably less than they need.

But a series of surveys from TIAA has identified three ways that plan sponsors can help to improve retirement outcomes for their employees.

Employees want income for life, for instance, with 49 percent saying that their retirement plan’s top goal should be providing guaranteed monthly income in retirement.

And although it’s something they badly want, 41 percent are unsure if their current plan has that as an option.

1. Employees need help figuring how much retirement income they’ll need and how to translate savings into income – Plan sponsors can help with this, said the data, by helping employees be realistic about how much income they’ll need in retirement—something few have figured out.

While 63 percent of Americans who are not retired estimate that they’ll need less than 75 percent of their current income to live comfortably, most experts recommend replacing 70–100 percent of current income in retirement.

Compounding the situation is the fact that 53 percent of employees haven’t even figured out how to translate their savings into income—while 41 percent of people who haven’t yet retired are saving less (many considerably less) than the 10–15 percent of income experts recommend.

Lifetime income options such as annuities are one way to guarantee income replacement during retirement, but most people are unaware of them or of how they work. Just 10 percent of Americans have annuities, so for the other 90 percent, they’re not an option.

2. Employees are interested in receiving financial advice – Sponsors can also offer financial advice as part of a benefits package.

While 61 percent of those who have received advice feel confident about their financial situation, just 37 percent of people who haven’t feel that way.

But the cost—or perceived cost—of seeking advice is putting them off, as is distrust of advisors in general.

Although 71 percent of Americans say they’re interested in receiving advice, more than half haven’t.

For instance, 35 percent of Americans who have not worked with a professional financial advisor say they don’t think they have enough money to justify a meeting; 51 percent say they don’t have enough money to invest (49 percent believe they need more than $50,000 in savings to get an advisor to talk with them), while 45 percent have concerns about cost and affordability.

And 34 percent don’t know whom they can trust.

3. Employees can use tools and resources early and in all stages of retirement planning – Last but not least, the study found that getting involved early in the planning process can make a difference.

Sponsors who introduce resources for all stages of the financial planning process, with customizable planning tools and tailored support based on employees’ life stages, can help employees consider what they need to do to prepare for retirement, even if that day is years away.

Such tools can make it easier for employees to evaluate their personal risk tolerance, asset allocation and the current status of Social Security and Medicare to help them better envision their future retirement and the steps they can take to make sure that their retirement is successful

See the original article Here.

Source:

Satter M.(2016 December 8). 3 ways to help employees with retirement planning[Web blog post]. Retrieved from address http://www.benefitspro.com/2016/12/08/3-ways-to-help-employees-with-retirement-planning?ref=hp-news