The unpaid caregiver crisis is landing on employers’ doorsteps

According to new data, 43 million Americans currently are tending to a family member in need, which can be both physically and emotionally taxing on the caregiver. Read this blog post for more on the unpaid caregiver crisis.


Scott Williams knows firsthand what it is like to support a sick relative. But even after spending 20 years tending to his ailing mother, he didn’t consider himself a caregiver.

“She suffered from multiple chronic conditions, but I never considered myself a caregiver,” he says. “I just thought I was a son who loved his mom.”

Williams, who is vice president and head of global patient advocacy and strategic partnerships at the biopharmaceutical company EMD Serono, realized that because he didn’t think of himself as a caregiver, he wasn’t able to take advantage of the benefit offerings his company had in place for these workers.

“Until I really started to think about it, I didn’t realize how burned out I really was,” Williams says. “I was in that sandwich generation, which is a situation that many caregivers find themselves in sometimes.”

Williams dilemma is not uncommon. There are 43 million Americans currently tending to a family member in need, according to data from LIMRA. AARP estimates that caring for a loved one can cost close to $7,000 out of pocket.

"I never considered myself a caregiver, I just thought I was a son who loved his mom.” Scott Williams

It is also both physically and emotionally taxing — 57% of caregivers need medical care or support for a mental health condition, according to an Embracing Carers survey. About 55% of caregivers say their own physical health has diminished, 54% say they don’t have time to tend to their own medical needs and 47% report feeling depressed.

The caregiving crisis puts employers in a unique position to offer benefits, policies and resources that can ease some of this stress. Indeed, there are some employers that already stepped up. For example, Starbucks launched a new caregiver benefit last year. Amgen and Brinker International, use digital tools to offer caregiving benefits to their workers.

Regardless, the need for employer-provided backup child, adult and senior care options is still largely unmet. Only 4% of employers offer backup childcare services and only 2% offer backup elder care, according to data from the Society for Human Resource Management.

The breakdown of communication between the company and the worker may be keeping the majority of employees from accessing the assistance they need. If employers ignore this issue or simply fail to communicate with employees, it can end up becoming a burden that costs the company money or result in the loss of a worker.

But there are some steps employers can take. The first is to identify the responsibilities of the family caregiver so that employers can better address their needs. One of the biggest responsibilities caregivers face is the amount of time they have to spend transporting loved ones, says Ellen Kelsay, chief strategy officer for the National Business Group on Health citing recent data on the subject. These employees often have to leave work early, come in late or take off to get an ill family member to their doctor’s appointments.

“The financial impact is considerable, many of these employees are paying out of their own pocket to support the medical care of a loved one. So there is financial assistance that they need,” Kelsay says. “When you think about the impact on the employee, they [struggle from a] physical, mental and emotional wellbeing perspective.”

About half of unpaid caregivers work full time outside of their home and many have to take leaves of absence or cut back their work hours due to the demands of caring for a family member, LIMRA research shows. A significant portion of employees had to stop working in order to better care for their loved one — about 22% say they voluntarily quit their jobs, 18% had their employment terminated and 13% chose to retire early.

Unlimited PTO, remote work, shared sick time and an employee resource group are just a few offerings employers can offer staff, Williams says. For instance, EMD Serono created an employee resource group for caregivers, a peer to peer network where employers can find dedicated resources, while also having an exchange with colleagues who are going through similar situations.

But there is still more that can be done, Williams says. Training managers to be more understanding of an employee’s needs can go a long way toward bridging the gap. Another option companies should consider is enhancing employee assistance programs to include caregivers, he adds.

“One of the things we see employers doing that can really help is being able to raise the visibility of [the available] resources,” Williams says. “To really ensure that whether you’re a new employee or an established employee in an unpaid caregiving situation that you have access to them.”

SOURCE: Schiavo, A. (11 July 2019) "The unpaid caregiver crisis is landing on employers’ doorsteps" (Web Blog Post). Retrieved from https://www.benefitnews.com/news/improving-caregiving-challenges-through-the-workplace


7 ways employers can support employee caregivers

Seventy-three percent of employees in the United States act as caregivers for a child, parent or friend, according to research from Harvard Business School. Continue reading for seven ways employers can support employee caregivers.


The number of caregiving adults in the U.S. has reached a tipping point.

As the baby boomer generation gets older, an increasing number of people in the workforce are taking on the role of unpaid caregiver for a family member or friend. Many also are in the midst of raising their own children, which means they’re pulled in many different directions, trying to keep up with work commitments and family responsibilities. In fact, according to researchers at Harvard Business School, 73% of employees in the U.S. are caring for a child, parent or friend.

What do all these statistics point to? They mean that employers have an opportunity to play a role in helping employees balance these often competing priorities.

The Harvard study highlights the impact of employee caregiving responsibilities on the workplace. While only 24% of employers surveyed believed employee caregiving influenced their employees’ performance at work, 80% of the employees who were surveyed admitted that caregiving had an effect on their productivity at work and interfered with their ability to do their best work.

The survey also found that caregiving can affect employee retention, with 32% of the employees surveyed saying they had left a job because of their caregiving responsibilities. In addition, employees who are caregivers are more likely to miss work, arrive late or leave early, which affects not only productivity, but also the employees’ ability to progress in their careers.

Employers can take a proactive role in supporting employees who are caregivers. That support, in turn, can have a positive effect on productivity, morale and employee retention. Here are seven strategies employers should consider.

Create an organization-wide understanding of the challenges caregivers face.

Employees who aren’t sure that their managers and leaders would understand the juggling they’re doing and the stresses they face are more likely to not only have problems at work, but — because they face high stress levels trying to get everything done at home and work — they also are at higher risk for a number of health problems such as depression and heart disease. By creating a culture that allows employees to openly express their challenges and ask for support, employers can not only keep employees healthy and productive, they also can reduce secondary costs associated with decreased productivity and chronic health problems.

Know what challenges employees face.

Regular employee surveys can help employers assess employees’ needs in terms of caregiving and tailor the benefits the organization offers to help meet those needs.

Communicate the benefits that are available.

In many cases, employers already offer programs and benefits that can help employees who are caregivers such as an employee assistance program and referral services for finding caregivers who can help when the employee isn’t able to. However, many employees aren’t aware these programs are available, so it’s important to continuously share information about them in company newsletters, emails and at meetings.

Consider flex time and remote work options.

Depending on the employees’ work responsibilities, employers can offer flexible work arrangements that allow employees to work different hours or to telecommute for a certain number of days per week.

Change the approach to paid time off.

Rather than dividing paid time off into vacation days, sick days and personal days, consider grouping all time off into one category. That allows employees to take time off for caregiving as needed. A growing number of companies, including Adobe, Deloitte, Bristol-Meyers Squibb and Coca-Cola, are also offering paid family leave benefits so that employees can take time off to provide care.

Connect employees with resources.

Beyond an EAP and referral services, employers can offer programs that connect caregivers with resources for both their caregiving role and for the self-care they need to remain healthy and able to handle both job and caregiving roles better. Those resources can include:

Beyond an EAP and referral services, employers can offer programs that connect caregivers with resources for both their caregiving role and for the self-care they need to remain healthy and able to handle both job and caregiving roles better. Those resources can include:

  • Advisory services that help employees connect with healthcare providers for their parents, children and themselves
  • Nurse managers, case managers and geriatric care managers who can help employees who are managing the care of a family member who’s living with a serious health condition or disability
  • Advocates who can help employees who are dealing with complex insurance claims for the person they care for, planning for long-term care, or managing the legal and financial complexities that can arise when a parent or spouse dies

Internal caregiver resources groups that bring together employees who are dealing with the issues surrounding caregiving so that they can share ideas and experiences

Measure how well your support is working.

The first step to supporting caregivers in the workforce is to implement policies, programs and benefits that offer them the tools they need to balance work and caregiving. An equally important second step is to regularly review what is offered, how much the offerings are used, and by which employees. Ask employees for feedback on how effectively what the organization provides is in helping them with issues they face as working caregivers and solicit ideas for new approaches and tools they’d like to have.

SOURCE: Varn, M. (25 March 2019) "7 ways employers can support employee caregivers" (Web Blog Post). Retrieved from https://www.benefitnews.com/list/7-ways-employers-can-support-employee-caregivers


Addressing Long-Term Care Concerns

When insurance plan conversations lead to discussions about after retirement, there are certain hot-button issues that will swing employee conversations out of your control. When helping older employees with retirement and beyond, two topics will change the atmosphere in the room. One is the long-term viability of Social Security, which frequently comes up as a question. The second is on the conversation of long-term care, which has the possibility to make or break a retirement plan. In this installment of CenterStage, Donald McClurg, one of our financial advisors, breaks down what matters and offers answers to many of the questions concerning long-term health.

What Exactly is Long-Term Care? What’s Gobbling up Your Retirement?

You place insurance on the things that are valuable to you, such as your car, your home and possibly your pet. What about your life? Is your family of importance to you, and beyond that, what about your legacy (i.e. any funds left over from your lifetime given into your living family members)? Currently, there’s about a 50% chance a 65-year-old will require care such as an in-home nurse or a medical/assisted living facility that can deliver optimal, specialized care. For employees near retirement or the 65 years-old mark, there is a trove of questions surrounding long-term care, including:

  • Should I consider a hybrid long-term care plan?
  • Is the insurance worth it for me, given how insurers have been increasing the price of premiums?
  • How do I avoid a government facility should I need care?
  • How much money should be saved and when should saving begin?
  • Can I afford this/Will I make it?
  • What are my blind spots?

Unfortunately, the “right” answer to these vexing questions regarding long-term healthcare is exclusively individual-specific. Factors in the determination are dependent upon the individual’s wealth, age, desire to leave a bequest and a need for peace of mind, amongst all other factors. Donald believes, “The biggest risk to a financial plan is not running out of money, it is incurring a financial catastrophe later in life and not having protection. Right now, that catastrophe has the highest probability of showing up in the form of long-term care.”

Commonly viewed as less superior to other insurance options already being taken out of a paycheck, the fact of the matter is this is not another out-of-pocket expense placed on you, such as renters or car insurance. Rather, long-term care should be seen as a valuable choice; an investment in your future and for your family. As a “numbers guy”, Donald brings up the importance of three variables in particular: 70, 90, and 5, which mean:

  • Singles 65 and older stand a 70% chance of needing long-term coverage
  • Couples 65 and older stand a 90% chance of needing long-term care
  • Only 5% of Americans have long-term coverage plans

The Driving Factor for Long-Term Care

Individuals display an adversity to paying for long-term coverage, as they are worried about the chance of paying for it and not needing it or having to leave their homes and live out their lives in a facility. If that’s you, you may consider a hybrid plan. Most hybrids solve the two main deterrents of long-term care insurance by:

  • Allowing for in-home care (that’s right, they don’t force you into a facility)
  • Return of unused premiums. (i.e. whatever portion you don’t use is returned to your beneficiary)

According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the average cost for a semi-private room in a nursing home is $6,844 per month, with the average stay being around 2.5 years. As previously listed, 52.3% is the expected percentage of people turning 65 who will have to have a long-term care need during their lives. That is over half the population of individuals turning 65 years of age who will need the assistance offered through long-term care.

The most misleading stat is that 63% of people spend $0 on long-term care. This is because roughly half of Americans have exactly $0 in savings or will have $0 when/if they need long-term care. Those individuals typically find themselves at facilities who accept Medicaid, meaning they are more than likely falling short of the care they need. Here’s the most under reported and most impactful fact of long-term care: the burden is falling on your employees. In total, an estimated $3 trillion in lifetime wages is lost due to unpaid care-giving responsibilities.

How Can Employers Offer Better Long-Term Care Solutions?

It has been said that happy employees are productive employees, and as an employer, you naturally want to increase both the productivity and well-being of employees. Of the many things your employees stress about (home, kids, work, etc.), money is always at the top of the list. In fact, a study investigating employee productivity and well-being found that employees spend 3-4 hours per week, 4-5 times per hour worried about finances. At Saxon, we are happy to help employers implement useful financial tools for their employees to leverage.

For the majority of the working world, healthcare derives from employers, thus, the head of the organization is the one responsible for properly educating employees on their coverage. As the saying goes, “proper planning prevents poor procedure.” With Saxon, employers can schedule a brief, in-house seminar with one of our stellar financial advisors and a long-term care specialist. Through these seminars, clients and employees will discover clear solutions to anything that may still have them on the fence about investing in long-term health. Employees will come to learn the real value in long-term care, such as the reason behind asset location mattering more than asset allocation.

Ready to explore your options and become one of the 0.5% of businesses currently offering long-term care insurance to their employees? If so, don’t hesitate; pick up the phone and call Donald with Saxon Financial today at (513) 609-4404 or toll-free at (800) 847-1733 to discover how you can avoid the single largest threat to your employees’ retirement.

Why Saxon Is the Right Choice for You

At Saxon, we care about you – your family, your company, your finances, and your future. We cultivate our years of practice and experience to deliver exceptional service to you every time. We empower you by placing the tools and knowledge necessary into your hands to deliver remarkable returns on investment. An engagement with Saxon is unique. This is because we have invested in developing a culture where business is personal. Our clients are the central heart of our organization; meaning that without you we have no purpose.

To Saxon, experience matters. We know that outcome is crucial, but to us, it matters how we get there. By taking intentional action in an authentic manner, we are a catalyst for your success that is positively refreshing. We invite you to explore the Saxon way.


Photography by American Advisors Group Via Flickr: Retirement Calendar Retirement Date When using this image please provide photo credit (link) to: www.aag.com per these terms: www.aag.com/retirement-reverse-mortgage-pictures

15 Most Expensive States for Long-Term Care: 2017

Are you reaching retirement? Then, perhaps, you've already looked into the affordability of long-term care, and - well - it's not as affordable as you thought. If you're looking to get the most out of your retirement budget, then you may want to stray away from these 15 most expensive states for long-term care, as of 2017.

This article is brought to you by Think Advisor, and it was written by Marlene Y. Satter. You can read the full article here.


Genworth’s annual study on the cost of care nationwide, which includes home care, assisted living facilities, etc., is not reassuring

The price of long-term care insurance is high—for everyone involved. Not just the patient but also the caregivers pay in more than money to make sure that the person in need of care is given the best care they can manage.

In this year’s version of Genworth Financial’s annual study on the cost of care nationwide—not just in nursing homes, which are less and less on the forefront, but also care provided at home, adult day care and assisted living facilities—the news is not reassuring. Costs have risen steadily, with those for licensed homemakers—those who provide what the study calls “hands-on personal care” for patients still in their homes—rising the fastest, increasing 6.17% just since last year.

And of course since people would prefer to stay in their homes, that’s going to hit a lot of people hard.

Less-skilled “homemaker care,” such as cooking, cleaning and running errands (not included in the breakdown that follows) has risen pretty quickly as well, increasing by 4.75% since last year. But both versions of homemaker assistance are at the low end on the price scale, coming in at $21 for homemaker care and $22 for licensed homemaker care. The big bucks are elsewhere.

They may not have risen as quickly percentage-wise as the two already mentioned, but adult day care increased by 2.94% since last year to a national median rate of $70 per day. Assisted living facilities now average a median monthly rate of $3,750, an increase of 3.36% from last year, while nursing homes, at an increase of 5.50% for a private room, now run a median daily rate of $267. No matter how you look at it, that’s a lot of money.

And caregivers often sacrifice their own financial well-being to care for their family members, forking over an average of $10,000 out of their own pockets for expenses that range from household expenses, personal items, or transportation services to payment of informal caregivers or LTC facilities.

A whopping 62% are paying for these expenses out of their own retirement funds; 45% have seen those costs cut their basic quality of living; and 38% have cut the amount they devote to savings and retirement to meet the costs of care.

And another sad side effect of all this stress is that 27% say it’s had a negative impact on their relationship with the person they’re caring for.

The penalty for all this devotion is that absences, reduced hours and chronic tardiness can end up cutting a caregiver’s pay. About a half of caregivers estimate that they lost approximately a third of their income.

Check out the 15 most expensive states for LTC.

Seven Foot Knoll Lighthouse at the Inner Harbor in Baltimore.

15. Maryland

Average Annual LTC Cost: $60,305

  • Adult day care: $2,150
  • Licensed home care: $52,281
  • Assisted living: $49,800
  • Nursing home (private room): $118,990

Prospect Terrace Park in Providence.

14. Rhode Island

Average Annual LTC Cost: $60,789

  • Adult day care: $19,500
  • Licensed home care: $57,772
  • Assisted living: $61,860
  • Nursing home (private room): $104,025

Hollywood Blvd in Los Angeles.

13. California

Average Annual LTC Cost: $61,239

  • Adult day care: $20,020
  • Licensed home care: $57,200
  • Assisted living: $51,300
  • Nursing home (private room): $116,435

Seattle Sea Seahawks Fans (Photo: AP)

12. Washington

Average Annual LTC Cost: $61,704

  • Adult day care: $16,900
  • Licensed home care: $60,632
  • Assisted living: $55,920
  • Nursing home (private room): $113,362

Skier on the slopes at a Killington Resort. (Photo: AP)

11. Vermont

Average Annual LTC Cost: $63,139

  • Adult day care: $34,320
  • Licensed home care: $57,200
  • Assisted living: $49,527
  • Nursing home (private room): $111,508

State Capitol in Bismarck. (Photo: AP)

10. North Dakota

Average Annual LTC Cost: $64,010

  • Adult day care: $25,480
  • Licensed home care: $63,972
  • Assisted living: $36,219
  • Nursing home (private room): $130,367

Lobster boats in Portland.

9. Maine

Average Annual LTC Cost: $64,423

  • Adult day care: $28,080
  • Licensed home care: $53,768
  • Assisted living: $58,680
  • Nursing home (private room): $117,165

Times Square, New York City.

8. New York

Average Annual LTC Cost: $65,852

  • Adult day care: $20,800
  • Licensed home care: $54,340
  • Assisted living: $47,850
  • Nursing home (private room): $140,416

The Corbin Covered Bridge in Newport, New Hampshire. (Photo: AP)

7. New Hampshire

Average Annual LTC Cost: $66,044

  • Adult day care: $18,720
  • Licensed home care: $60,357
  • Assisted living: $58,260
  • Nursing home (private room): $126,838

Old Capitol building in Dover.

6. Delaware

Average Annual LTC Cost: $68,472

  • Adult day care: $18,850
  • Licensed home care: $50,908
  • Assisted living: $72,180
  • Nursing home (private room): $131,948

Atlantic City Beach.

5. New Jersey

Average Annual LTC Cost: $68,833

  • Adult day care: $23,400
  • Licensed home care: $52,624
  • Assisted living: $69,732
  • Nursing home (private room): $129,575

Waikiki shoreline in Honolulu.

4. Hawaii

Average Annual LTC Cost: $71,820

  • Adult day care: $18,200
  • Licensed home care: $59,488
  • Assisted living: $51,000
  • Nursing home (private room): $158,593

A statue of the Spirit of Victory in Bushnell Park in Hartford. (Photo: AP)

3. Connecticut

Average Annual LTC Cost: $72,671

  • Adult day care: $20,800
  • Licensed home care: $52,624
  • Assisted living: $55,200
  • Nursing home (private room): $162,060

Beacon Hill in Boston.

2. Massachusetts

Average Annual LTC Cost: $73,307

  • Adult day care: $16,900
  • Licensed home care: $59,488
  • Assisted living: $67,188
  • Nursing home (private room): $149,650

Crabbers on the fishing grounds in southeast Alaska. (Photo: AP)

1. Alaska

Average Annual LTC Cost: $117,800

  • Adult day care: $43,709
  • Licensed home care: $63,492
  • Assisted living: $72,000
  • Nursing home (private room): $292,000

You can read the full article here.

Source:

Satter M. (2 October 2017). "15 Most Expensive States for Long-Term Care: 2017" [Web Blog Post]. Retrieved from address http://www.thinkadvisor.com/2017/10/02/15-most-expensive-states-for-long-term-care-2017


Saxon U Session- Long Term Care and Options April 25th

Don’t be a Burden on your Family, Prepare Now for the Future

Please join us as we discuss Long Term Care and Options available to you.

[button color="#ffffff" background="#0f4c16" size="large" src="http://marketing.experience-6.com/acton/form/1515/019f:d-0002/1/index.htm"]Register for the Seminar[/button]

Date: April 25th @ 6:00 PM

Place: Desha’s @ Harpers Point

Address: 11320 Montgomery Rd Cincinnati, OH 45249

Space is Limited to 20

RSVP to Sandra Burchwell @ sburchwell@saxonconsultants.com

 

 


Younger buyers buying asset-based LTC

By Marli D. Riggs

The sale of asset-based long-term care insurance protection continues to grow significantly, reveals research by the American Association for Long-Term Care Insurance.

More than half (53%) of male LTC buyers were under age 65, up from 48% in a prior year’s study, while women buyers under age 65 also increased to 50%, up from 44%, according to data gathered from  insurers.

Meanwhile, premiums increased nearly 20% and the number of covered lives increased 13.5%.

"We expect the sale of asset-based or linked LTC products will continue to grow as they offer some highly attractive benefits to a category of buyers looking to protect their retirement savings," says Jesse Slome, AALTCI's director. "The growth of sales will only continue as more large players enter the marketplace.”

In 2011 the study finds that the initial single premium face amount of policies purchased was $100,000 or greater for 73% of new policies. Meanwhile, 96% of new life and LTC policies issued did not include a benefit increase option that bumped up available benefits to keep pace with inflationary growth of costs. Additionally the study of traditional individual LTC insurance policy sales finds that in 2011 some 96% included a growth option.

“At a time when long-term care is increasingly top of mind, these life insurance-based solutions avoid the ‘use it or lose it’ risk associated with traditional long term care insurance,” says Chris Coudret, vice president of OneAmerica. “In most cases, people make a single payment, effectively removing the risk of future premium increases.”